Get to Know Ryan Beveridge!

Ryan Beveridge

Ryan Beveridge is starting his 3rd season as a coach at J World Annapolis, having just completed his freshman year at University of Maryland College Park, where he specializes in engineering. The first in his family to sail, he started sailing in 6th grade and continued to do so every summer, sailing on both dinghy boats and keelboats alike. Ryan has experience sailing Person 27’s and Flying Scots, the latter of which has a fleet near his hometown. Currently, Ryan sails on the University of Maryland college sailing team.

Read more

Update from our friends on the left coast

2010-01-22_3471_HulaGirl

The Unbearable Lightness of Sailing (in the 2015 Transpac)…

And we are off in the 2015 Transpac Race from LA to Hawaii! J/World’s Hula Girl got a nice start a couple of boatlengths down from the committee boat, with a wide lane and good speed. The beat to Catalina Island was pretty much normal, although maybe a bit lighter than usual. We had a nice 10 knots, and carried our heavy #1 jib all the way. For a while it looked like we might lay the island, but it ended up taking a couple tacks to get around the West End. Then we were off on the starboard tack drag race, pushing out to sea, through the last of the Channel islands and into the beautiful Pacific.. The breeze held wonderfully through the night, and we had a fantastic sail…. but in the morning, well, it was a different story. The Pacific is certainly living up to her name. We knew it was going to get light. Everyone out here did. So it was absolutely no surprise as the breeze tapered off and left us struggling to nurse every once of power, every drop of speed, from our sails and our boats. It’s now late Friday night (well, early Saturday morning), and it has been a tough day. The unstable, light, shifty breeze has taken a consistently high level of attention and focus. I have always argued that it is tougher to sail a boat efficiently when it is light than when it is heavy. then throw in an ocean swell that is coming from an entirely different direction than the wind, and well, you have a bit of a challenge on your hands. What little breeze there is seems to always come straight from where we want to go, straight from Hawaii. and so we try to play the huge shifts to make any progress at all towards the islands, but our tacking angles in these light breezes are huge, and the tacks are slow and painful. Regardless, the crew has been doing a great job in these challenging conditions. It’s a new boat (to them), a new team, a new event, and, well, even a new ocean for most of them! So while it isn’t your typical Transpac so far, we are pretty much rolling with it and we’ll see what shakes out. Still have over 2000 miles to go! There is the tropical storm Dolores pushing up form the south, and then the typical tradewind flow that should try to develop again, well, hopefully before this race ends, so who knows where the breeze will be, and when it will get here? We all have our guesses, I am sure, and it will be interesting to see everyone’s position tomorrow morning after this instability has shuffled up the fleet. I would expect there to be a pretty big spread in things…. Life onboard is good. We have seen whales and dolphins, little jellyfish and lots of nice blue water. Had to back down in the middle of the night when we landed on a kelp island in an apparent attempt by the on-watch crew to claim it for King and Country. I am glad I have hidden/rationed much of the snack food onboard since everyone just grazes when it gets light. It’s dark out tonight, clouds covering the sky and soaking up what little light there is…. and while it sure makes the phosphorescence in the water something wild, it also makes the sailing really, really tough. Anyway, that’s it for now… our preliminary report for this running of the Transpac, Stay tuned for more! Wayne Zittel and the Hulagains J/World’s Hula Girl

Read more

Return of Euro Trash Girl, Part 4- Conclusion

Charleston SC to Annapolis MD – April 19-24, 2015


It was a beautifully brisk and sunny Thursday morning this April 23rd. Our 4th day on the water has us safely heading north up the Chesapeake Bay. Conditions were still choppy with unpredictable winds gusting over 20 knots. We had a very small storm sail in the inventory so we made the decision to swap it out for the headsail. It really didn’t benefit us much, but at least we had practice changing out sails again, in less than smooth conditions I might add.

The Bay really is a beautiful body of water to sail on, much wider than one may think at 30 miles wide near Cape Charles, MD to the south and only 4 miles near Aberdeen, MD to the far north. I’m borrowing a few interesting tid bits from the web, including www.chesapeakebay.net. This is the largest estuary in the United States and stretches over 200 miles and holds 18 TRILLION gallons of water. The average depth is

The old rusted ship.
The old rusted ship.

only 21 feet and those who sail here know that much of its 4,480 square miles of surface area, including tidal tributories, is much much shallower than that and with ETG’s 7 foot draft- it’s important to study your updated charts. They say a guy my height could actually wade through over 700,000 acres and never get his hat wet! The following photos shows a ship that was blown off course near Tangier Island, which became its permanent address based on the rust!

Wave conditions thankfully began to calm down somewhat during the day, the constant pounding of this wild ride was really getting old. The storm sail was replaced by the jib, but the sails were short lived with winds directly on the nose. The always reliable diesel was unfortunately needed for propulsion, but first we had to siphon 20 gallons of fuel into ETG’s belly, thank goodness for calmer waters. Read more

Return of Euro Trash Girl, Part 3

Charleston SC to Annapolis MD – April 19-24, 2015


The driver has always got to be focused- ETG isn't equipped with auto pilot!
The driver has always got to be focused- ETG isn’t equipped with auto pilot!

Wednesday, April 22nd we were blessed with a beautiful spring day. Not sure of the exact temperatures but the smell of suntan lotion was in the air as we enjoyed the warmth of the sun on our pale skin that had been covered up all winter. The morning hours to about lunch time consisted of minimal winds requiring the always reliable diesel to be fired up. Again, no big deal since our batteries and fridge needed to charge and the drivers could kick back and relax a little. Not sure if I mentioned that Euro Trash Girl is not equipped with auto pilot technology, thus requiring the driver to remain completely focused during their 1 hour stint at the wheel. Read more

Return of Euro Trash Girl, Part 2

Charleston SC to Annapolis MD – April 19-24, 2015


Tony steps up to be the first to skipper.
Tony steps up to be the first to skipper.

It was early afternoon and we were all very excited to finally be sailing away from the Charleston Harbor. As I mentioned, one of the requirements for this US Sailing Coastal Passage Making course required that each of us assume the role of skipper for at least 100NM and Charlie was selected first.

Over the next 24 hours Charlie would coordinate all operational needs of the vessel, under the watchful eye of JWorld Captains of course! First and foremost he would need to make sure we were heading in the right direction! Based on our preliminary course, which was plotted prior to departure with traditional navigation techniques, we were dead reckoning right on track. Over the next several days each crew member would rotate assignments including navigator. We would routinely and often plot a fix on our paper charts using GPS, knowing where you are can come in handy!
Once we were several miles out of the channel and into the deep blue sea we chose to adjust our first projected waypoint to take advantage of the prevailing winds, which saved time and distance. Adjustments like this…were made occasionally during this passage and we all became proficient at correcting and adjusting our dead reckoning on the charts. After taking an electronic GPS fix on our position we changed our course to steer to 069 magnetic. This bearing was projected all the way out 114NM to Frying PanShoal off the coast of Cape Fear North Carolina. Cape Fear, why did they name this area that? never mind, don’t think about it! Read more

Return of Euro Trash Girl, Part 1

Charleston SC to Annapolis MD – April 19-24, 2015


In November 2014 I participated in my first blue water passage with the ARC-Bahama from Annapolis MD to Abaco Bahamas aboard JWorld’s J120 s/v Euro Trash Girl. A little personal background- at that time I had taken Basic Keel Boat and Basic Cruising courses from JWorld Annapolis and have skippered bareboat charters for family vacations in the USVI/BVI a few times. The sailing in the islands is great, however, you are always in sight of land. Before the ARC a couple of seasoned sailors, perhaps “salty dogs” is more appropriate, told me to be careful because blue water may start to run through my veins. At the end of that exciting and successful journey I knew that I would need to go off shore again. Months went by and occasionally my day dreams would take me back to that incredible ARC experience. In late February I was contacted by JWorld Captain Tony with an offer to join his crew to bring s/v Euro Trash Girl back from Charleston SC to her home port in East Port Annapolis. I wanted desperately to go but unfortunately the timing coincided with a St Martin trip my wife and I had already scheduled. While on vacation I would look out at the sailboats wondering when I would set sail again. Not long after returning from St Martin I was contacted again by Captain Tony. He informed me that the passage had been delayed until the middle of April and this time the timing was right and I happily agreed to sail with him again! Read more

Skip to toolbar